Emu Meat Cuts

The six major carcass cuts are:

  • Neck (about 1 1/2 pounds of meat) which is cut into sections like oxtail or deboned for ground.
  • Rib Cage – 3 pounds trimmed for ground.  This includes the strip running along the backbone.
  • 2 Thighs (see cuts 1 through 7 on the chart below)
  • 2 Drums (see cuts 8, 9 & 10 on chart below)

Emu Hindquarter, Meat Cuts and Muscle Names

 Meat Cut International #’s of muscles in cut
Muscle(s)
with prefix M omitted
Weight Before Desilvering Tenderness
rating*
1. Fan EM 1046 Iliofibularis 1 lb. 4 oz (567 g)  1
2. Top Loin EM 1047 Iliotibialis cranialis 1 lb. (454 g)  1
3. Outside Strip EM 1036 Flexor Cruris lateralis 10 oz (238 g)  2
4. Round EM 1035 Iliotibialis lateralis 1 lb 9 oz (709 g)  2-3
5. Inside strip EM 1050
EM 1037
EM 1038
(Caudo-)iliofemoralis;
flexor cruris medialis
pubo-ischio-femoralis
7 oz (198 g)

6 oz (170g)

1-3
6. Tip EM 1041
EM 1042
EM 1043
EM 1059a
EM 1059b
Femorotibialis complex:
Femorotibialis Medius,
Femorotibialis Externus,
Femorotibialis Internus,
Femorotibialis Accessories, pectineus
1 lb + (454 g+)  2-3
7. Oyster EM 1045
EM 1073b
EM 1073d
EM 1059c
Liofemoralis internus:
Iliotrochantericus cranialis,
Caudalis;
Ambiens (part of)
12 oz (340g)  1-4
8. Inside Drum EM 1011 Gastrocnemius, pars interna 1 lb 7 oz  3-8
9. Outside Drum EM 1012 Gastrocnemius, pars externa 1 lb (454 g)  3-5
10. Mid-Drum EM 1013 Fibularis longus 1 lb. (454 g) 3-5

 

Information provided by the Emu Farmers Handbook, Vol 2 by Maria Minnaar (ISBN 0-9643741-4-5)
* Tenderness rating is from 1 to 5, with 1 being the most tender.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

2018 AEA National Convention

2018 AEA National Convention - Greensboro, NC

Marriott High Point Hotel - Greensboro Airport

Marriott High Point Hotel - Guest Room

Marriott High Point Hotel - Indoor Pool

Marriott High Point Hotel - Lounge

Save the Date for an exciting AEA National Conference and visit historic Greensboro.

Presidents Meeting and CBM Meeting are scheduled for Thursday afternoon, July 12, 2018

  • AEA Convention – 9 AM Friday thru 11 AM Sunday, July 13-15,2018
    • Speakers Friday and again Saturday afternoon
    • AEA Annual Membership Meeting, Friday 3 PM
    • Friday evening Welcome Party
    • Saturday morning, 8:30 AM to 1:30 PM

— Farm Tour including Birds Of A Feather Discussion & Lunch —

  • Saturday evening Banquet
  • Sunday morning Round Table Discussion

Greensboro, NC

July 13th to 15th, 2018

To Register For The Convention: Download a Convention Registration Form

To Reserve A Room At Marriot HIgh Point Hotel: Call:  800-228-9290

(For convention rates, be sure to mention – American Emu Association Group)
Guest Room Nightly Rates are $120.00 + tax (current tax – 12.75% for a total of $136.30) Hot Breakfast Included

June 10th is the last day these rates will be available

Save the Dates & Join Us in 2018!

July 13-15, 2018

Hotel: Marriott Greensboro Airport Hotel 1 Marriott Dr, Greensboro, NC 27409 Phone: (336) 665-6511 Website: http://www.marriott.com/GSONC

Marriott High Point Hotel

Marriott High Point Hotel Greensboro Airport One Marriott Drive, Greensboro, NC 27409

2014 National Emu Convention Draws Near

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Illinois Welcomes the American Emu Association (AEA)

East Peoria, IL – On July 18th-20th emu farmers from around the United States will attend the 3 day 2014 American Emu Association (AEA) National Convention held this year at the Embassy Suites Hotel in East Peoria, Illinois. AEA members and other emu growers will meet for 3 days of education and demonstrations with a chance to meet new people and visit with old friends. AEA Board members, Certified Business Members (CBM) and State Presidents will meet one day prior to the start of the convention.

Convention attendees will be brought up to date on industry concerns, be given information that will put more money in their pockets and all attendees will have the opportunity to participate in round table discussions. Ample time will be included to network with other emu farmers, product companies and processors from across the nation and around the world.

The “EMU MALL” will offer the opportunity to browse booths that showcase emu related products such as health/beauty products and emu egg artwork, while others will offer farming merchandise or information. This exhibit area will be open to the public on Friday and Saturday. In the “EMU MALL” you will also find the “Emu Egg Art Contest” on Friday from 9 am – 6 pm. Contest entries will be on display and you will have the opportunity to bid on the eggs of your choice. Online bidding is also open until Thursday, July 17th at www.AEAEggArtContest.com.

The focus of this year’s convention is the “25th Anniversary Celebration – 25 Years Of Yesterday’s Memories, Joys Of Today & Hopes For Tomorrow”. Topics will include Industry Status, Profitability, Business Opportunities, Marketing, Benefits of Emu Oil and the Basics of Raising & Handling Emus.

Featured speakers will include – Maria Minnaar, the Godmother of the Emu Industry and author of the Emu Farmer’s Handbook l & ll, and Todd Green with information on ratites and what they have learned about cassowaries; Mohammad S. Alam, PH,D, on “Fats & Oils: Chemistry, Types of Fat and Nutritional Values”; Ngon Nguyen on “Alpha-Gal Meat Allergy & Emu Farming: My Allergy, My Farm & Our Industry” along with Paul Binford and Marsha Huddleston on “Feed Effects on Oil Characteristics” to help emu farms make more money.

Round Table discussions including hatching, fencing, processing, catching and loading, etc., a discussion of Today’s Challenges in the Emu industry, Great Hints, Tips & Ideas from others and the annual AEA business meeting along with a Friday evening Welcome Night and a Saturday night Banquet, will help to fill this 2 1/2 day event.

“There will be an incredible amount of information provided”, stated Susan Wright, 2014 convention registration coordinator. “We plan to share a lot of information about the emu industry and will spend quality time with other emu growers.” New information and industry insights will be shared and there will be some new promotional brochures available to those looking to market their birds, oil and meat.

Come celebrate the 25th anniversary of the American Emu Association. Join in the fun. Meet old friends and make new ones while sharing your memories, joys and hopes.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Consumer Alert!! Illegal Emu Oil In The Philippines

Consumer Alerts posted on this site are due to violations with regard to the American Emu Associations (AEA) policies for use of their trademarked properties. Companies or individuals listed here have been given notice of the violation and the policies for compliance. They have been given reasonable time to comply, and they have been notified that they will be listed on this page if they are not in compliance by a certain deadline. Those in violation who notify the AEA that changes have been made and are verified to be compliant will be removed from this Consumer Alert page.

The information on this page is subject to change and may not be reproduced in any manner by members or non-members.

Emu Oil has become a good selling product in the Philippines and in many parts of the world. With the demand of emu oil growing, so is the illegal and improper use of the AEA Certified Fully Refined® seal on packaging and in advertising.

In the Philippines you can find several companies and several different brands claiming to have AEA Certified Fully Refined® Emu Oil. CONSUMER’S BEWARE of these false claims.

What Consumers in the Philippines and all over the world must know:

  • Many companies want to sell AEA Certified Fully Refine® emu oil because of value and consumer confidence.
  • The fact is that many companies will illegally use the Trademark so they can get more money for their emu oil.
    At this time there are no companies in the Philippines authorized to use the AEA Certified Fully Refined® trademarked seal or the corresponding verbiage on their emu oil.
  • There is NO AEA Certified Fully Refined® Australian emu oil. This is misleading information that is used to confuse customers about what they are buying.

The American Emu Association registers each batch of refined emu oil that meets the standards of quality established in the AEA Certified Emu Oil Program. This guarantees quality and assures the customer that they are buying pure emu oil, not a blend of emu oil mixed with another oil. AEA Certified Fully Refined® Emu Oil is recognized worldwide as the standard for quality emu oil.

The AEA Certified Emu Oil Program was developed to establish quality control measures that will ensure pure emu oil legitimately displaying the AEA Certified Fully Refined® seal, or being marketed using the corresponding verbiage, is a high quality product that meets or exceeds the industry recognized standards for Fully Refined Grade A Emu Oil.

The AEA Certified Fully Refined® seal and verbiage are registered trademarks of the American Emu Association (AEA) and can only be used by AEA members with board approval. Unauthorized use will be considered trademark infringement. Unauthorized users will be listed on the AEA Consumer Alert Page and dealt with accordingly.

I. Michael Eppley
President
American Emu Association

AEA Certified Fully Refined® Emu Oil is recognized worldwide as the standard for quality emu oil. The AEA Certified Emu Oil Program was developed to establish quality control measures to ensure that pure emu oil legitimately displaying the AEA Certified Fully Refined® seal, or being marketed using the corresponding verbiage, is a high quality product that meets or exceeds the industry recognized standards for Fully Refined Grade A Emu Oil as defined in the Emu Oil Trade Rules (rule 103).

EMU OIL - Life Just Got Better® and AEA Certified Fully Refined® (plus the corresponding verbiage) are registered trademarks of the American Emu Association (AEA) and can only be used by AEA members with board approval. Unauthorized use will be considered trademark infringement and will be dealt with accordingly.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

So How Do They Like This Weather?

San Angelo, TX – So how do they like this weather? It doesn’t matter if the weather in question is blazing hot or freezing cold, it’s a question every emu farmer gets asked at some point during the year. As snow blankets most of the nation, emu farmers are doing their best to make sure their livelihood makes it through the winter months with minimal discomfort and weight loss.

Like any other livestock, the further north you go, the more shelter is needed. In the far south emu may shelter under pole barns or beside a hay bale while in the far north they winter in barns. It is pretty much the same as cattle, reported De McCleery, American Emu Association Ag Committee Chair. McCleery went on to say that where necessary farmers put down crushed barn lime or sand to prevent the big birds slipping on ice. The most popular bedding seems to be straw. In farming you have to plan ahead. Do I want to go out each day and chop ice out of the water trough or do I want to run electricity out and put in a heater? Do I want to haul feed each day or use a gravity feeder? said McCleery. Farmers make decisions that are proactive, not reactive.

One important proactive decision is the feed. From May to September emu should be on a high carbohydrate diet to help put on that important layer of fat, said McCleery. Around October the breeders are switched to a high protein feed while yearlings remain on a high carbohydrate diet. Breeding season combined with harsh weather would be a lot rougher without a layer of fat to help the birds through winter. During breeding season, feed consumption drops and egg production begins. Emu are generally processed at 14 to 16 months for their lean Heart Healthy red meat, but farmers also market several valuable food by-products. This includes the fat; which is refined into an omega rich oil; the hide, which is made into beautiful leather products; and the feathers, which are used in the fashion and craft industry.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, emu are being raised on over 5,000 farms across the country. Many of these farms sell their finished, consumer ready products online or at local farmers markets.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Emu Oil Offers Hope to Diabetics

Some Physicians Are Using Emu Oil To Assist In Diabetic Wound Care

San Angelo, Texas – Diabetic wound care has been of great concern to physicians for many years and with good cause. Even simple wounds can take twice as long to heal and they always have the potential to deteriorate into something severe. Over 150 million people worldwide have diabetes and the number is expected to double by 2010. Of these, it is estimated that at least 15% will develop foot ulcerations and that related complications will require 3% to have a lower limb amputation. However, some physicians are finding that the addition of emu oil to the treatment regime for diabetic wound care offers some hope in the battle to save limbs.

Dr. Robert Winston, a Jackson, Tenn. physician, states that his use of emu oil has shown promise. “I have treated several diabetic wounds with antibiotics using emu oil as a transport from the outside in,” the doctor said. “The results have been amazing.”

The use of emu oil as a carrier for antibiotics may offer diabetic patients and attending physicians aid in the battle to promote healing and find ways to lessen the extent of the prolonged and painful traditional treatments usually involved in the treatment of decubitus ulcers. Dr. Winston will be a guest speaker at The 2006 Emu Oil Seminar for Medical Professionals on Saturday, July 15. The seminar is being held in conjunction with the American Emu Association National Convention, held this year at the Madison West-Marriott Hotel in Middleton, Wisconsin. Area medical professionals are invited to attend the event which takes place from 1 to 5 PM.

A board certified internal medicine practitioner at the Eastside Medical Center in Jackson, Tennessee, Dr. Winston has practiced medicine for over 25 years. He enjoys staff privileges at Regional Hospital of Jackson, Jackson-Madison County General Hospital and Meharry Medical College Dept. of Continuing Education.

For more information about the AEA National Convention, contact the Wisconsin Emu Association (WIEA) at 866-608-8224 or check out their web site at www.wiea-emu.org.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

A New Medium for Scratch Art

San Angelo, TX – You hold the whirring drill carefully and gently apply the bit. As it scratches away a paper-thin layer of dark green calcium, a lovely shade of teal comes into view. You follow the pattern lines you applied earlier and slowly the image becomes recognizable. You have just taken the first steps toward joining artists around the world who carve eggs as a hobby or professionally.

Eggs have been etched, carved or sculpted for centuries. Because of their thick shells, ratite eggs such as ostrich or rhea have always been a popular choice for carvers ready to move up to the larger size, but emu eggs draw interest for a different reason.

Emu eggs have three main layers of color. The dark green outer covering varies from hunter green to almost black. The middle color is a teal green, the inside a bright white. The teal is actually as many as 7 subtle layers of color, each about the thickness of a sheet of paper. Egg carvers utilize these different layers of color to add texture and depth to their artwork. The natural colors of the shell make even a simple design dramatic. The American Emu Association hopes to draw attention to the versatility of emu eggs by partnering with egg artist DeShea Villoch and offering a series of classes during their annual convention this July.

“I call it ‘scratch art’ because this definition seems to best fit my technique,” explains Villoch. “In scratch art, the artist paints several layers on a surface or works from what they call a ‘scratch board.’ Then they draw the outline of their picture and scratch through the different layers of paint or board to create their art. With the emu egg, Mother Nature has eliminated the need to paint. She already provided us with multiple layers to scratch through.”

Villoch says that while an emu egg might be considered fragile compared to other art mediums, it is actually quite sturdy. DeShea stresses that emu egg scratch art doesn’t require any experience or artistic background; and it is a relatively inexpensive hobby. Working with the American Emu Association, she will be conducting a series of egg carving classes in conjunction with the association’s annual convention, held this year at the Madison West-Marriott Hotel in Middleton, Wisconsin. Participants do not have to be members of the association in order to take the classes, which are scheduled for July 13, 14, 15 and 16.

Students will bring their own electric multi speed Dremel with a flex shaft. Burrs will be supplied for use during the class, as will facemasks and eggshells. Participants will also receive an instructional video and companion booklet to take home. She states that while previous carving experience isn’t necessary, it would be a good idea for participants to familiarize themselves with their drill and flex shaft before class time.

Although instruction, supplies and the video would normally cost well over $100.00, cost for the class is only $50.00. “We are pleased to be able to offer something so affordable to local artists,” says Joy Reavis, WIEA president. “It is a great package, especially with the step by step instructional video they will be taking home.”

For local information about egg carving classes or the convention, contact the Wisconsin Emu Association (WIEA) at 866-608-8224 or check out their “NEW” web site at www.wiea-emu.org

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Easter Egg Surprise

Texas Mom Scratches Color off Eggs

San Angelo, TX — With Easter just around the corner, households across the country are preparing to color eggs for their annual Easter Egg Hunt. In the Villoch household, mom handles things a little differently; she removes color from eggs in order to create works of art.

Texas egg artist DeShea Villoch works with emu eggs using an egg carving technique she dubs “scratch art.” The large, dark green eggs lend themselves very well to carving. Beneath the dark green topcoat the artist may carve through as many as seven paper-thin layers of teal before reaching the final layer of bright white shell. The texture, contrast and natural colors of the shell make even a simple design dramatic.

“I call it ‘scratch art’ because this definition seems to best fit my technique,” explains Villoch. “In scratch art, the artist paints several layers on a surface or works from what they call a ‘scratch board.’ Then they draw the outline of their picture and scratch through the different layers of paint or board to create their art. With the emu egg, Mother Nature has eliminated the need to paint. She already provided us with multiple layers to scratch through.”

DeShea first became interested in egg carving not as an enterprise for herself, but for her 37-year-old handicapped son, Keith. Keith had been depressed since the local Mental Health/Mental Retardation agency closed its sheltered wood working shop. After seeing a simple silhouette carved on an emu egg, she wondered whether or not Keith could do it. After talking to the carver, she borrowed her husband’s dremel drill, purchased a few cutting burs, and began to experiment with carving silhouettes on the eggs so she could teach him. As they bonded while working on eggs together, she learned that the different layers of color lent itself to much more than just silhouettes.

Since that first year, Mrs. Villoch has completed over a hundred commissioned works, written several articles on egg carving, had several gallery showings, appeared on two television specials and produced a “scratch art” video. For a number of years DeShea has taught group and private classes, and given seminars on her technique. DeShea is quick to point out that she has had no prior art instruction, and that she considers her classes to be merely sharing her learned technique. DeShea has partnered with the American Emu Association to offer classes to the general public during their annual convention, held this year at the Madison West-Marriott Hotel in Middleton, Wisconsin, July 13 – 16, 2006.

For local information about egg carving classes or the convention, contact the Wisconsin Emu Association (WIEA) at 866-608-8224 or check out their “NEW” web site at www.wiea-emu.org

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

2012 National Emu Convention Draws Near

Missouri Event Provides Learning Experience

KANSAS CITY, Missouri – On July 13th-15th emu farmers from across the United States and around the world will attend the 3 day 2012 American Emu Association (AEA) National Convention being held this year at the Marriott Kansas City Airport Hotel, Kansas City, Missouri. AEA members along with other emu growers, will meet for 3 days of education and demonstrations with a chance to meet new people and visit with old friends.

AEA Board members, Certified Business Members (CBM) and State Presidents will be meeting prior to the start of the convention.

Convention attendees will be brought up to date on industry concerns, current emu oil research and will have the opportunity to participate in round table discussions. Ample time will be included to network with other emu farmers, product companies and processors from across the nation and around the world. The booth area, labeled the “EMU MALL”, will be open to the public. The “EMU MALL” will offer the opportunity to browse booths that showcase emu related products such as leather, health/beauty products and emu egg art, while still others will offer farming merchandise or information.

The AEA “Eggs’travaganza” Egg Art Contest will conclude on the evening of July 13th at the convention. A variety of emu egg shell artwork entries will be listed on the American Emu Association website, www.AEAEggArtContest.com for a Silent Auction shortly after June 15th. Works of art from all over the United States along with information about the artists, can be viewed on this website with the opportunity to bid.

The focus of this year’s convention is “Continuing the Journey”. Topics will include Feed, Industry Status, Profitability, Business Opportunities, Marketing and the Basics of Raising & Handling Emus. With the increasing high demand for emu fat, oil and meat, this is an event you will not want to miss!

The annual AEA business meeting on Friday afternoon, a Friday evening Welcome Night and a Saturday night Banquet will help to round out this 2 1/2 day event.

“There will be an incredible amount of hints, tips and practical advice provided”, stated Joylene Reavis, 2012 convention co-chair. “We plan to share a lot of information about the emu industry with plenty of time to spend visiting with old friends and meeting new ones.”

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Live Bird Request

Live Bird Request

If you are an farmer seeking to diversify your farming operation by adding emu, a homesteader seeking livestock suitable for small acreage or simply want to add an emu or two to your farm managerie, fill out the form below and your request will be forwarded to members of the American Emu Association with a request that anyone able to meet your needs contact you.  The AEA has many State Affiliates and we encourage you to contact your local state president to find out meeting locations and times.  Check our Emu Breeders Directory to find ads for emu farms in your area.

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