S.T.E.P. – Student Training and Education Program – Emu Project Record Book

The Emu Project Record Book is ideal for 4-H members, FFA members or anyone who has an emu and would like to keep a detailed record of their project. The record book was originally created as a part of the Texas Emu Association’s Student Training & Education Program (S.T.E.P.). This program is no longer active but, the 37 Page Emu Project Record Book is now available as a CD and can be ordered for $10.00 from Emu Today and Tomorrow and is also available as a PDF on this site.

To order contact:

Emu Today & Tomorrow
http://www.emutoday.com/
11950 W. Highland Ave.
Blackwell, Oklahoma 74631
phone: 580-628-4607

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

School Lesson Plan now available

“The School Lesson Plan – Emus” is a new online resource for teachers. This informative overview of emus and the products they provide starts with a review of the Ratite family that includes ostrich, emu, cassowary, rhea and kiwi. This slide show guides the viewer through the many unique qualities of the emu. After the comparison of the members of the Ratite family, the slides move on to the emu skeleton, hatching emu chicks and the many products produced from this amazing creature. This totally usable bird provides nutritious lean meat; moisturizing emu oil; quilled emu leather; durable non-static feathers and edible eggs with dark green eggshells that are sought after by crafters for painting, decorating and carving.

CDs of the School Lesson Plan – Emus (cost $15.00 + $5 shipping) can be ordered from

Emu Today & Tomorrow
http://www.emutoday.com/
11950 W. Highland Ave.
Blackwell, Oklahoma 74631
phone: 580-628-4607

The CD contains the WORD script and the presentation in both PowerPoint and pdf. format. We have attached a reduced resolution pdf file so you can review the presentation first. The CD will have greater clarity. You will need Adobe Reader to open it. Download Adobe Reader

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

What’s An Emu ? – brochure

print the pdf brochure

I suppose you’re wondering… What’s an Emu?

Emus are native to Australia. Emus are 5 to 6 feet tall and weigh 90-130 pounds with short, stubby wings but, they cannot fly.  Emus are processed for their meat, fat, hides & feathers.
Ratites are a group of mostly flightless birds that come in a huge variety of shapes and sizes. The largest and most famous species living today is the African ostrich. The smallest memebrs of the group are the tinytinamous of Central and South America that barely stand eye-to-eye with a chicken.
Emu Skeleton is the same as a velociraptor dinosaur (see image below).
Emu Feathers have one quill with two vanes (see image below).
Emu Meat is a very nutritious, dark red meat.
Emu Oil is the rendered & refined fat from the emu. It contains:  nutrition for the cells, natural anti-inflammatories, omegas 3, 6 & 9.
One Large Emu Egg c an be equal to 12 medium chicken eggs. Emu Egg Shells can be Decorated, Painted & Carved.
 

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

About Emus… – brochure

print the pdf brochure

Facts for the Teacher

  • Emus have been in Australia fr over 80 million years.
  • Emus are members of the ratite family of birds, along with ostrich, rhea, cassowary and kiwi.
  • Ratites have flat breastbones and no wing muscles, do they cannot fly.
  • Emu are cursorial.  They have developed strong legs for running.  An emu can run 40 miles per hour for short distances.  All ratites are cursorial.
  • Emus have 3 forward pointing toes; the underside of each is flat with a broad pad.
  • Emus have interesting calls, a throbbing drum (by the female) and a grunt (by the male). The chicks will whistle and the male will whistle to them.
  • The emu has a pad of fat on the back.  Because the fat is all in one place instead of being spread throughout the body, the meat is very lean.
  • Emu feathers are unique because both the primary and secondary feathers are the same length.  Each feather has two shafts, with barbs so widely spaced that they do not interlock to form a firm vane as in most birds; instead they form a loose, hair like body covering.
  • Emus lay an egg every 3 to 5 days during the breading season.  Breeding season runs from October through April in the United States.

Emu Eggs are dark green.  The female lays an egg every 3-5 days.  As she lays the eggs, the male will cover them with leaves, grass, straw or whatever is available until he is ready to start incubating them.  When there are at least 9 eggs, the male will start sitting on the nest.  The male will incubate the eggs for 52-56 days.  He will not eat or drink during this time.  When the eggs hatch, the first thing he will do is eat the eggshell.  This helps to get his system going, and also hides evidence of the chicks from predators.  The chicks will stay with their daddy until they are grown.  On farms, the eggs are usually picked up by the farmer and put in an electric incubator.  If the father is allowed to hatch, he is provided with food and water.

Emu Chicks are cream colored with brown and tan stripes. As they get older, they lose their stripes.  By the time they are 6 months old, they will be a chocolate brown color.  By the time they are 2 years old, they will have lost the chocolate brown colored feathers in favor of the lighter colored feathers of the adults.

Emus originated in Australia, but are now raised on farms throughout the United States for their lean red meat and other food by products products…

In the wild, emus eat fruits, flowers, insects, seeds and green vegetation; they love caterpillars.  To aid in the digestive process, they will swallow large stones.  They need water daily.

On American farms, emus are fed a special pelletized feed that has all the nutrients they need to develop strong, healthy bodies.  Emus grow to be between 5 1/2 to 6 feet tall and weigh 110 to 120 pounds.

Every part of the emu is used.

  • Meat is eaten.
  • Feathers are used in fashion or crafts.
  • Hide and Leg skins become leather.
  • Fat becomes emu oil and used in health and beauty products.
  • Claws are used in jewelry and crafts.

 

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

General Emu Fact Sheets

The following two printable general emu fact sheets provide a factual overview of the emu. Including anatomy, chicks, meat, eggs, feathers, leather, fat and oil. These sheets were created for teachers, but are relevant to anyone seeking more general information about emus.

Facts for the Teacher, print the pdf brochure
Facts for the Teacher about Dromaius novaehollandiae, print the pdf brochure

FACTS FOR THE TEACHER

From the American Emu Association: About Dromaius novaehollandiae

D. novaehollandiae novaehollandiae

Dromaius novaehollandiae

A large cursorial bird, Dromaius novaehollandiae originated in Australia but is raised on farms throughout the United States for it’s lean red meat and
food by-products such as fat, hide and feathers. Dromaius novaehollandiae actually consists of three subspecies of emu.
As you look at the birds being raised on emu farms, can you guess which of these sub-species were the parent stocks of those birds?
The three living sub-species are:
D. novaehollandiae novaehollandiae
On maturity and during breeding season, these birds have a cream-colored (or whitish) ruff or bib of feathers starting a few inches below the head. The pendulous pouch is larger than in other two sub-species and sways during strut.

D. novaehollandiae woodwardi

The metatarsus bone is shorter with a larger diameter. The body is wider than the other two sub-species. This sub-specie originated in southeastern

Australia.
D. novaehollandiae woodwardi
On maturity and during breeding season these birds have a ruff or bib of feathers starting a few inches below the head. This ruff appears darker than that of the novaehollandiae novaehollandiae and the pendulous pouch is not as apparent. The body is slender and the legs longer than that of novaehollandiae novaehollandiae. Overall the feathers are paler than the other two subspecies. This sub-specie originated in northern Australia.

D. novaehollandiae rothschildi

D. novaehollandiae rothschildi –

On maturity this bird does not have a ruff or bib. It looks ‘flat-chested’ compared to the other two sub-species. The pendulous pouch is almost non-existent in this emu.  Like the novaehollandiae woodwardi, the metatarsus bone is long with a small diameter, making this bird taller than novaehollandiae
novaehollandiae. The feathers are the darkest of the three sub-species. This subspecies originates in southwestern Australia.
These three sub-species are interbreeding in both Australia and the United States.

Extinct Species of Dromaius

There are four other known species/sub-species of Dromaius that are now extinct.
D. ocypus exists only as a fossil
D. novaehollandiae diemenensis – This subspecies of novaehollandiae was reportedly a large emu with dark feathers. The body type was similar to that of
novaehollandiae novaehollandiae. It was found on the large island of Tasmania. The Tasmanian Emu became extinct around 1850.
D. baudinianus – The Kangaroo Island Emu became extinct around 1827.
D. ater – King Island Emu – At 4 and half feet tall and weighing under 60 pounds fully grown, this black feathered emu was the smallest of the species. You
may find it referred to as d. minor or as the dwarf emu. This emu lived on King Island, the northwestern island in Tasmania, Australia. By 1805 it had been hunted to extinction by sealers and visiting sailors. The one thing these three extinct southern Australia emus have in common is that they all had darker feathers than the mainland emus. For this reason early settlers referred to either black emu or spotted emu.  Dromaius novaehollandiae is the spotted emu.

The Pendulous Pouch

In the lower part of the trachea, just before the thoracic inlet, is a segment of trachea comprised of 7 to 12 incomplete rings that form a tracheal diverticulum or open cleft. A very thin membrane covers this cleft. During breeding season this membrane enlarges, creating a pendulous pouch.  This pouch is easy to see in females during their first three years of breeding, but in subsequent years does not enlarge as much. Males also have this cleft, but the membrane does not enlarge as much.  This cleft is the source of the booming and grunting.
Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Subphylum Vertebrata
Class Aves
Order Struthioniformes
Family Dromaiidae (emu)
Genus Dromaius (emu)
Species
  • Dromaius baudinianus (extinct)
  • Dromaius ater (extinct)
  • Dromaius ocypus (extinct)
  • Dromaius novaehollandiae

Sub-species

  • D. novaehollandiae novaehollandiae
  • D. novaehollandiae woodwardi
  • D. novaehollandiae rothschildi
  • D. novaehollandiae diemenensis (extinct)

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Children’s Songs

The following are some emu adapted songs to the tune of well known children’s songs.  Click on any of the pages below to download and print the coloring page.  Adobe Reader is required.  Click here to download a free version.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.