A Wholesome Combination

A Wholesome Combination Oatmeal and emu combine to make healthier, but still flavorful dishes.

San Angelo, TX – Making healthy food choices is important, especially for people under the care of a physician. When family members equate healthy diets with eating cardboard, modifying their eating habits can be an uphill struggle. This can be very frustrating for the cook trying to provide nourishing meals. According to Chef James Ehler of Minnesota, some simple substitutions can update an old family favorite, making it a healthier, but still flavorful dish.

Two adjustments that can be made to meat loaf recipes are fairly simple. Instead of bread crumbs, use oatmeal as a binder. Oatmeal is a complex carbohydrate with high fiber. It will encourage slow digestion and help to stabilize blood-glucose levels. Replace beef with a leaner meat, such as emu. You can use ground emu the same way you use very lean ground beef, says Ehler. Recognized as Heart Healthy by the American Heart Association, emu is low in saturated fats and ranked best in 15 out of 20 essential nutrients in a USDA funded study at the University of Wisconsin. This makes it an excellent health choice for those with immune deficiencies.

Although oatmeal is easily found, alternative meats such as emu currently require a little more effort to locate. According to Charles Ramey, president of the American Emu Association (AEA), the association receives calls periodically from consumers looking for the lean red meat. We either provide them with a list of companies that can handle their request, or provide their contact information to the companies, said Ramey.

Emu meat is available either vacuum packed frozen or fresh. It may be mail-ordered from individual producers or can be found at retail in specialty food stores, health food stores and retail establishments around the country. According to AEA, emu is a deep red colored meat with no marbling. Because it is very lean, there will be little to no shrinkage during cooking. A moist heat and shorter cooking time is recommended for most recipes. Chef Ehler offers several main dish recipes using emu, as well as other alternative meats, on his website www.foodreference.com, including the one below.

Heart-y Emu Meat Loaf

2 lbs Ground Emu 3/4 cup Quick Cooking Rolled Oats 3/4 cup Fresh Tomatoes, chopped fine 1/2 cup Yellow Onion, chopped fine 1/2 cup Green Pepper, chopped fine 2 cloves Garlic, minced 2 Whole Eggs, slightly beaten 1/4 cup Catsup 1 1/2 TB Worcestershire Sauce 2 TB Pickapeppa Sauce OR Spicy BBQ Sauce 2 tsp Oregano 1 1/2 tsp Black Pepper 1 1/2 tsp Salt

TOPPING

1/2 Cup Ketchup 2 Tablespoons Honey 3 Tablespoons Spicy BBQ Sauce

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  • Mix all ingredients gently, but well and form into a loaf in a baking pan.
  • Do not over mix, as this tends to make for a tough (too firm) meat loaf.
  • Shape into a loaf, and using a butter-knife, score a crisscross pattern on top of loaf.
  • Mix topping ingredients together and coat top of meat loaf.
  • Bake covered for 45 minutes, uncover and bake another 45 minutes.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Heart Healthy Never Tasted So Good!

It may seem odd to hear of a red meat being touted as a health food; but the emu industry is doing exactly that, and with good cause. “Many consumers have been instructed to give up red meat because of cholesterol, but since emu is low in saturated fats, as well as being packed with the vitamins and minerals needed by those with immune deficiencies, it is an excellent health choice,” said Charles Ramey, AEA president. Recognized as Heart Healthy by the American Heart Association, emu ranked best in 15 out of 20 essential nutrients in a USDA funded study at the University of Wisconsin.

The results of this research have brought emu to the forefront of alternative meat choices, but the market remains minute compared to standbys like beef or turkey. Last year Americans consumed an estimated 300,000 pounds of emu, this year consumption is estimated at over half a million pounds. “The cattle industry deals in tons, we deal in pounds,” laughed Ramey. Ramey went on to say that the American Emu Association receives calls periodically from consumers looking for the lean red meat. “We either provide them with a list of companies that can handle their request, or provide their contact information to the companies,” said Ramey.

Emu meat is available either vacuum packed or fresh. It may be mail-ordered from individual producers or can be found at retail in specialty food stores, health food stores and retail establishments around the country. According to AEA, emu is deep red colored meat with no marbling. Because it is very lean, there will be little to no shrinkage during cooking. A moist heat and shorter cooking time is recommended.

Heart Healthy Meat Loaf

2 pounds ground emu
1/2 cup oatmeal
1 chicken egg
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1/2 cup minced onion
1/2 cup minced bell pepper

Mix all ingredients by hand in large bowl. You should have a very moist mixture. Pour into casserole and bake covered at 350° for 45 minutes. Remove lid and bake an additional 10 minutes. Serves 6.

Emu Scaloppini with Mushroom Sauce

1 pound emu steaks (1/4 inch thick)
2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
1 1/2 cup chicken broth
1/2 teaspoon lemon pepper
1/2 stick of margarine
1 medium onion, sliced
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon parsley, minced

Lightly pound the steaks until 1/8″ thick. Sprinkle with lemon pepper. In a 12″ skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of margarine over moderate heat. (Add more margarine as needed) Sear emu steaks on both sides and transfer to a platter, cover with foil and keep warm. Add remaining ingredients (except for parsley) to skillet. Bring to a boil and boil uncovered; stirring frequently, until slightly thickened and vegetables are tender. Pour over emu steaks. Serves 4.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Nutrient Rich Soup Chases Winter Chill

Frost on the windshield, leaves crunching underfoot, that nip in the air that sends you inside with flushed cheeks, it all adds up to soup weather. Soup comes in single servings or family size containers. You can get it with pop-top lids, in disposable heat and eat bowls or even foil packets. It comes condensed or ready to heat and serve. Despite the instant comfort offered by the supermarket soup aisle, there is just nothing like homemade soup on a cold winter’s day.

Homemade soup is almost impossible to mess up. Ingredients can be added or deleted from the recipe; it can be made using items at hand and can be sipped from a mug or eaten from a bowl. You can start with a simple stock and turn it into something light and nourishing or wonderful and filling. Vegetable soup can be dressed up with meat or poultry. To avoid the fats found in some meat, many cooks are turning to emu. In addition to being lower in saturated fats, emu is higher in protein and eleven different vitamins and minerals including iron, zinc, B12, B6, selenium and potassium than most other meats. This nutrient-rich red meat may be mail-ordered from individual producers or can be found at retail in specialty food stores, health food stores and retail establishments around the country. For additional information about emu meat and where it can be found, contact the American Emu Association at 541-332-0675 or check out their web site at www.aea-emu.org.

This rich soup is something to look forward to when you have been working outside on a cold winter’s day.

Winter Rich Soup

1 pound ground emu
3 large all-purpose potatoes (peeled and cubed)
2 cans (13 3/4 ounces) chicken broth
1 large or 2 medium-sized onions (roughly 1 cup) chopped
2 medium sweet green pepper, halved, seeded and chopped
2 medium-size sweet red pepper, halved, seeded and chopped
3 to 6 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
1 cup sour cream
1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese

In large saucepan or Dutch oven, boil the potatoes in enough water to cover until tender. Drain and mash, adding chicken broth and blending until smooth. Set soup mixture aside.

Saute onion, green bell pepper, and red bell pepper in butter until softened, about 10 minutes. Add ground emu and brown lightly, seasoning with pepper. Add to soup mixture and heat until just boiling. Reduce heat. Add sour cream, stirring gently. Serve in soup bowls, garnish with the cheddar cheese. Serves 8.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Emu Recipe Bookmarks

Five recipies are printed on one side of the bookmarks with the related nutritional information on the reverse side. The include receipies are:

  • Sweet ‘N Sour Emu Meatballs
  • Emu Flank Steak with Gorgonzola and Walnut Stuffing
  • Apple Stuffed Emu Flank Steak
  • Creamy Emu Casserole
  • Emu Pot Pie

Emu Recipe Bookmarks (print pdf document)

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.