So How Do They Like This Weather?

San Angelo, TX – So how do they like this weather? It doesn’t matter if the weather in question is blazing hot or freezing cold, it’s a question every emu farmer gets asked at some point during the year. As snow blankets most of the nation, emu farmers are doing their best to make sure their livelihood makes it through the winter months with minimal discomfort and weight loss.

Like any other livestock, the further north you go, the more shelter is needed. In the far south emu may shelter under pole barns or beside a hay bale while in the far north they winter in barns. It is pretty much the same as cattle, reported De McCleery, American Emu Association Ag Committee Chair. McCleery went on to say that where necessary farmers put down crushed barn lime or sand to prevent the big birds slipping on ice. The most popular bedding seems to be straw. In farming you have to plan ahead. Do I want to go out each day and chop ice out of the water trough or do I want to run electricity out and put in a heater? Do I want to haul feed each day or use a gravity feeder? said McCleery. Farmers make decisions that are proactive, not reactive.

One important proactive decision is the feed. From May to September emu should be on a high carbohydrate diet to help put on that important layer of fat, said McCleery. Around October the breeders are switched to a high protein feed while yearlings remain on a high carbohydrate diet. Breeding season combined with harsh weather would be a lot rougher without a layer of fat to help the birds through winter. During breeding season, feed consumption drops and egg production begins. Emu are generally processed at 14 to 16 months for their lean Heart Healthy red meat, but farmers also market several valuable food by-products. This includes the fat; which is refined into an omega rich oil; the hide, which is made into beautiful leather products; and the feathers, which are used in the fashion and craft industry.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, emu are being raised on over 5,000 farms across the country. Many of these farms sell their finished, consumer ready products online or at local farmers markets.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Emu Oil Offers Hope to Diabetics

Some Physicians Are Using Emu Oil To Assist In Diabetic Wound Care

San Angelo, Texas – Diabetic wound care has been of great concern to physicians for many years and with good cause. Even simple wounds can take twice as long to heal and they always have the potential to deteriorate into something severe. Over 150 million people worldwide have diabetes and the number is expected to double by 2010. Of these, it is estimated that at least 15% will develop foot ulcerations and that related complications will require 3% to have a lower limb amputation. However, some physicians are finding that the addition of emu oil to the treatment regime for diabetic wound care offers some hope in the battle to save limbs.

Dr. Robert Winston, a Jackson, Tenn. physician, states that his use of emu oil has shown promise. “I have treated several diabetic wounds with antibiotics using emu oil as a transport from the outside in,” the doctor said. “The results have been amazing.”

The use of emu oil as a carrier for antibiotics may offer diabetic patients and attending physicians aid in the battle to promote healing and find ways to lessen the extent of the prolonged and painful traditional treatments usually involved in the treatment of decubitus ulcers. Dr. Winston will be a guest speaker at The 2006 Emu Oil Seminar for Medical Professionals on Saturday, July 15. The seminar is being held in conjunction with the American Emu Association National Convention, held this year at the Madison West-Marriott Hotel in Middleton, Wisconsin. Area medical professionals are invited to attend the event which takes place from 1 to 5 PM.

A board certified internal medicine practitioner at the Eastside Medical Center in Jackson, Tennessee, Dr. Winston has practiced medicine for over 25 years. He enjoys staff privileges at Regional Hospital of Jackson, Jackson-Madison County General Hospital and Meharry Medical College Dept. of Continuing Education.

For more information about the AEA National Convention, contact the Wisconsin Emu Association (WIEA) at 866-608-8224 or check out their web site at www.wiea-emu.org.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

A New Medium for Scratch Art

San Angelo, TX – You hold the whirring drill carefully and gently apply the bit. As it scratches away a paper-thin layer of dark green calcium, a lovely shade of teal comes into view. You follow the pattern lines you applied earlier and slowly the image becomes recognizable. You have just taken the first steps toward joining artists around the world who carve eggs as a hobby or professionally.

Eggs have been etched, carved or sculpted for centuries. Because of their thick shells, ratite eggs such as ostrich or rhea have always been a popular choice for carvers ready to move up to the larger size, but emu eggs draw interest for a different reason.

Emu eggs have three main layers of color. The dark green outer covering varies from hunter green to almost black. The middle color is a teal green, the inside a bright white. The teal is actually as many as 7 subtle layers of color, each about the thickness of a sheet of paper. Egg carvers utilize these different layers of color to add texture and depth to their artwork. The natural colors of the shell make even a simple design dramatic. The American Emu Association hopes to draw attention to the versatility of emu eggs by partnering with egg artist DeShea Villoch and offering a series of classes during their annual convention this July.

“I call it ‘scratch art’ because this definition seems to best fit my technique,” explains Villoch. “In scratch art, the artist paints several layers on a surface or works from what they call a ‘scratch board.’ Then they draw the outline of their picture and scratch through the different layers of paint or board to create their art. With the emu egg, Mother Nature has eliminated the need to paint. She already provided us with multiple layers to scratch through.”

Villoch says that while an emu egg might be considered fragile compared to other art mediums, it is actually quite sturdy. DeShea stresses that emu egg scratch art doesn’t require any experience or artistic background; and it is a relatively inexpensive hobby. Working with the American Emu Association, she will be conducting a series of egg carving classes in conjunction with the association’s annual convention, held this year at the Madison West-Marriott Hotel in Middleton, Wisconsin. Participants do not have to be members of the association in order to take the classes, which are scheduled for July 13, 14, 15 and 16.

Students will bring their own electric multi speed Dremel with a flex shaft. Burrs will be supplied for use during the class, as will facemasks and eggshells. Participants will also receive an instructional video and companion booklet to take home. She states that while previous carving experience isn’t necessary, it would be a good idea for participants to familiarize themselves with their drill and flex shaft before class time.

Although instruction, supplies and the video would normally cost well over $100.00, cost for the class is only $50.00. “We are pleased to be able to offer something so affordable to local artists,” says Joy Reavis, WIEA president. “It is a great package, especially with the step by step instructional video they will be taking home.”

For local information about egg carving classes or the convention, contact the Wisconsin Emu Association (WIEA) at 866-608-8224 or check out their “NEW” web site at www.wiea-emu.org

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Easter Egg Surprise

Texas Mom Scratches Color off Eggs

San Angelo, TX — With Easter just around the corner, households across the country are preparing to color eggs for their annual Easter Egg Hunt. In the Villoch household, mom handles things a little differently; she removes color from eggs in order to create works of art.

Texas egg artist DeShea Villoch works with emu eggs using an egg carving technique she dubs “scratch art.” The large, dark green eggs lend themselves very well to carving. Beneath the dark green topcoat the artist may carve through as many as seven paper-thin layers of teal before reaching the final layer of bright white shell. The texture, contrast and natural colors of the shell make even a simple design dramatic.

“I call it ‘scratch art’ because this definition seems to best fit my technique,” explains Villoch. “In scratch art, the artist paints several layers on a surface or works from what they call a ‘scratch board.’ Then they draw the outline of their picture and scratch through the different layers of paint or board to create their art. With the emu egg, Mother Nature has eliminated the need to paint. She already provided us with multiple layers to scratch through.”

DeShea first became interested in egg carving not as an enterprise for herself, but for her 37-year-old handicapped son, Keith. Keith had been depressed since the local Mental Health/Mental Retardation agency closed its sheltered wood working shop. After seeing a simple silhouette carved on an emu egg, she wondered whether or not Keith could do it. After talking to the carver, she borrowed her husband’s dremel drill, purchased a few cutting burs, and began to experiment with carving silhouettes on the eggs so she could teach him. As they bonded while working on eggs together, she learned that the different layers of color lent itself to much more than just silhouettes.

Since that first year, Mrs. Villoch has completed over a hundred commissioned works, written several articles on egg carving, had several gallery showings, appeared on two television specials and produced a “scratch art” video. For a number of years DeShea has taught group and private classes, and given seminars on her technique. DeShea is quick to point out that she has had no prior art instruction, and that she considers her classes to be merely sharing her learned technique. DeShea has partnered with the American Emu Association to offer classes to the general public during their annual convention, held this year at the Madison West-Marriott Hotel in Middleton, Wisconsin, July 13 – 16, 2006.

For local information about egg carving classes or the convention, contact the Wisconsin Emu Association (WIEA) at 866-608-8224 or check out their “NEW” web site at www.wiea-emu.org

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

New Treatment for Chronic Non-healing Wounds Unveiled

Transdermal delivery eliminates the danger of liver or kidney damage

(EMAILWIRE.COM, July 28, 2008 ) San Angelo, TX–There are a number of different types of non-healing wounds, including those from diabetic complications (neuropathic ulcers), trauma, burns, bed sores, pressure sores and amputations. Wounds of this type often have exposed muscle, bone and tendons resulting in extreme pain for the patient. The usual treatment of these non-healing wounds is through IV administration of antibiotics, which may cause damage to the liver or kidneys. According to Robert Winston, M. D., using a transdermal delivery system allows antibiotic dosage 40 to 60 times greater than achieved by IV administration, without the danger of liver or kidney damage. Winston uses emu oil in his product, Wound Tech.

“When developing Wound Tech, I chose to use emu oil to assist with the transdermal delivery because it is faster than anything else on the market, stated Dr. Winston. It also reduces the inflammation, which helps speed healing. He went on to say that Wound Tech acts as a moisturizer and provides nutrition, vitamins, trace elements, anti-oxidants to the wound, along with antibiotics, which are added to the product by the physician at the time of treatment.

Winston discussed the new product during the 2008 Emu Oil Seminar for Medical Professionals held at the Holiday Inn East, Harrisburg, PA. As part of their mandate to educate the public about the uses of emu oil, the American Emu Association (AEA) sponsored the event on July 19, 2008. The seminar was held in conjunction with the annual American Emu Association National Convention. “We were delighted to be able to host this event which allowed the first hand sharing of emu oil experiences among health care providers,” stated AEA Board Member, I. Michael Eppley. This is the third year that an Emu Oil Seminar for Medical Professionals has been held during the annual convention.

As a Board Certified Internal Medicine Practitioner, the Tennessee physician has practiced medicine for over 25 years. Dr. Winston enjoys staff privileges at Regional Hospital of Jackson, Jackson-Madison County General Hospital and Meharry Medical College Dept. of Continuing Education.

Plans are currently underway to hold a fourth Emu Oil Seminar for Medical Professionals during the 2009 American Emu Association National Convention. The convention will be held in Orlando, FL.

For more information on Wound Tech or the use of emu oil as a transdermal carrier, please contact Dr. Robert Winston at 731-664-4702.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Medical Professionals to Share Experiences at Emu Oil Seminar

Practical use and scientific properties of emu oil to be discussed

(EMAILWIRE.COM, July 03, 2008 ) Harrisburg, PA – As a part of their mandate to educate the public, the American Emu Association (AEA) is sponsoring an Emu Oil Seminar for Medical Professionals on Saturday, July 19th at the Holiday Inn Harrisburg East, Harrisburg, PA. The seminar will run from 1:00 PM through 5:00 PM. Area medical professionals are invited to attend. The Emu Oil Seminar is being held in conjunction with the annual American Emu Association National Convention, hosted this year by the Pennsylvania Emu Farmers Association (PEFA). “We continue to see growth in the use of emu oil by medical professionals,” stated PEFA president I. Michael Eppley. “We are delighted to be able to host this event which allows first-hand sharing of emu oil experiences among health care providers.”

Dori Luneski, RN, NP will speak on Natural Healing with Emu Oil. Luneski is the director of the H. M. Wellness Center, Ijamsville, Maryland. A wellness practitioner for 11 years, she has over 40 years experience in the medical industry, including 6 years as a psychiatric nurse and 6 years as a rehabilitation nurse. Her fourth book, The Power to Heal has been endorsed by Dr. Earl Mindell, author of The Vitamin Bible, with a foreword by Dr. Matt Silver M.D.

Alan Greenberg, M.D. will speak on Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Emu Oil. Dr. Greenberg received his Doctorate at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1961 and practiced medicine for over 37 years, including 25 years in Neurology and Psychiatry. He is currently the CEO of Science Formulas, Inc., Jarrettsville, MD.

Robert Winston, M.D. will speak on “The Use of Emu Oil to Carry Antibiotics into Wounds”. Dr. Winston is a board certified internal medicine practitioner in Jackson, Tennessee, and has practiced medicine for over 25 years. He enjoys staff privileges at Regional Hospital of Jackson, Jackson-Madison County General Hospital and Meharry Medical College Department of Continuing Education. Dr. Winston states that his use of emu oil has shown promise. “I have treated several diabetic wounds with antibiotics using emu oil as a transport from the outside in, the doctor said. The results have been amazing.” Winston went on to say that he has seen 100% positive results in treatment of diabetic ulcers when emu oil is incorporated into the treatment protocol.

Leigh Hopkins, Pharm.D. will speak on “The Scientific Basis of Emu Oil”. Dr. Hopkins is President of Skin Sciences and Vice President of Renu Labs, based in Pennsylvania. A former Clinical Pharmacist at Thomas Jefferson University and Clinical Professor of Pharmacy at Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, Dr. Hopkins has worked on several emu oil studies and in the formulation of emu oil based products. He has degrees in biochemistry as well as a doctorate in pharmacy. Dr. Hopkins will discuss the biochemistry of aging skin and the use of emu oil as a transdermal carrier of nutrients into the skin.

William Code, MD will speak on Emu Oil Use in Medical Care, Research, & Emu Industry in Canada.Diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1996, Code was forced to retire from his busy practice in Anesthesia and Pain Management. Suffering from a debilitating state of fatigue, cognitive challenges, declining mobility, muscle spasms and nerve pain problems, he determined to find a solution. After exhaustive research he and his wife, Denise, a Registered Dietitian with a Master of Science in Nutrition, turned to integrative medicine. The results changed his life. His recovery journey is outlined in three books published in 2000, 2005 and 2007. The most recent book Winning the Pain Game outlines a roadmap to reducing chronic pain through nutritional choices.

The American Emu Association is a non-profit organization that represents the emu industry, an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.