Announcing the 2014 “EGGS’travaganza” Egg Art Contest Winners

As a way of promoting emu eggshell art, the American Emu Association (AEA) hosted the 2014 “EGGS’travaganza” Egg Art Contest.

All submitted emu eggshell art was on display for public viewing online at www.AEAEggArtContest.com and in person on public display on July 18, 2014 at the Embassy Suites East Peoria Hotel & Conference Center in Peoria, Illinois during the AEA’s annual national convention.

Artists competed for $600 in cash prizes. The prize money was awarded for the top 3 entries that received the highest bids. A Silent Auction with live bidders and online bidding was used to determine the winners.

The AEA is happy to announce the 2014 Egg Art Contest winners:

1st / 2nd Place Tie

Rebecca Perry with her entry 4 Winds Jewelry Box
Katy Wilson with her entry Brother Against Brother

3rd Place –

Andrea Vigneault with her entry The Dragon Egg

More entries for 2014 can be viewed at http://www.aeaeggartcontest.com

All of the 2014 entries will be showcased on the contest website for a least the next 12 months, giving excellent exposure and promotion for all of the contributing artists.

For more information about the “2014 EGGS’travaganza Egg Art Contest”, visit www.AEAEggArtContest.com.

“Four Winds Jewelry Box” by Rebecca Perry, Jackson, TN
“Four Winds Jewelry Box” by Rebecca Perry, Jackson, TN
“Four Winds Jewelry Box” by Rebecca Perry, Jackson, TN
“The Dragon’s Egg” by Andrea Vigneault, Hickory, NC

“Brother Against Brother” by Katy Wilson, Sweetwater, TN

“Brother Against Brother” by Katy Wilson, Sweetwater, TN

“Brother Against Brother” by Katy Wilson, Sweetwater, TN

“Brother Against Brother” by Katy Wilson, Sweetwater, TN

“Brother Against Brother” by Katy Wilson, Sweetwater, TN

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Announcing the 2014 AEA “EGGS’travaganza” Egg Art Contest Entries

The new entries for the 2014 “EGGS’travaganza” Egg Art Contest can be viewed at http://www.aeaeggartcontest.com

Check these works of art out! They are BEAUTIFUL!!!

And, don’t forget to bid on the egg you would like to have for yourself.

This will be a 2 phase auction:

Phase 1 is the Absentee/Proxy Bidding prior to the AEA Convention. If you can’t make it to the convention you can place a bid by using the Online Absentee/Proxy Bid Submission Form or you can download the form and mail or fax it to us. Absentee bids must be received by 4PM on July 17th, 2014.

Phase 2 is the Live Silent Auction Bidding which will take place from 9am-6pm ET, July 18, 2014, at the AEA Convention being held at Embassy Suites East Peoria Hotel & Conference Center, 100 Conference Center Dr, East Peoria, IL 61611.

Make sure to read the Rules, Terms, and Conditions of the contest.

Don’t miss your chance to own on one of these extraordinary egg creations!

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

The American Emu Association Does Not Recommend One Refining Method Over Another

The American Emu Association (AEA) does not endorse nor recommend any one method of refining emu oil. However, whatever method is used must result in a safe, pure, unadulterated emu oil product that follows the specifications of the Emu Oil Trade Rules, that the consumer can easily identify, and that meets consumer expectations for that Grade.

Formed in 1989, the American Emu Association (AEA) is a national, non-profit agricultural association dedicated to the emu industry. The Emu Oil Trade Rules were written and recently updated by the AEA to establish a grading system for emu oil and to identify standards that assure that your emu oil is safe, pure, and unadulterated. These Rules do not state nor imply which refining method is best. Another AEA initiative, the AEA Certified Emu Oil Program, was written to establish quality control measures for a business to market pure emu oil with the AEA Certified Fully Refined® seal and corresponding verbiage. This would assure consumers that they are buying pure emu oil that has been refined to meet the Emu Oil Trade Rules specifications for safe, pure emu oil.

Any business in America that wishes to sell pure emu oil is not required to become a member and follow these rules. But, it can be an asset to do so, because consumers are becoming more educated about the various grades and uses for emu oil. Consumers are now expecting top quality and usually ask for it, making their purchase decisions based upon it.

There is continuing controversy about which is the best refining method. Sometimes statements are made that say or infer that the AEA recommends one method over the other. That is not the AEA’s position. “The AEA’s goal for the national emu oil industry is to establish rules to produce and market a safe, pure, and unadulterated emu oil regardless of the refining method used,” states Tony Citrhyn, AEA’s President, “Emu oil needs to be identifiable to reduce and eliminate fraudulent business practices where companies have been marketing and selling blended and adulterated emu oil as pure emu oil.”

There is no secret to what these rules and specifications are to produce a safe, pure, unadulterated emu oil. The information is found in the Emu Oil Trade Rules. This is also true for the businesses who wish to use the AEA Certified Fully Refined® seal and corresponding verbiage to market their emu oil—see AEA Certified Emu Oil Program. The Emu Oil Trade Rules and the AEA Certified Emu Oil Program were recently updated to include the fatty acid profile to be required on the batch testing analysis. The fatty acid profile helps to identify and differentiate between pure emu oil and other types of animal and plant oils. This update was done because cases were questioned and tested where emu oil had been adulterated or cut with other types of oils; and then marketed and sold as pure emu oil. Not only are consumers dissatisfied when the product does not work as expected, but this unethical misrepresentation of pure emu oil hurts the integrity of many legitimate companies in the emu industry.

The AEA does not intend to make these programs confusing to understand or difficult to comply with, nor to put undue burden on any business or company to follow these programs. Again, it does not matter what kind of refining method is used. The objective of the two programs is to produce safe, pure, unadulterated emu oil that is identifiable as such. The consumer can pick a bottle off the shelf and be assured it is pure emu oil if it labeled with the AEA Certified Fully Refined® emu oil seal.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

AEA Study — Are you really buying pure emu oil?

AEA Study — Are you really buying pure emu oil? After the 2012 American Emu Association (AEA) Convention, the AEA Board hoped to find a way that would help our members, others in the emu industry, and consumers be sure they were purchasing authentic emu oil. There were discussions on adulterated emu oil in the marketplace and how the AEA Certified Fully Refined seal helps consumers know they are getting top quality emu oil.

The Board decided to do a study to discover the extent of the problem. There were 11 samples of emu oil purchased. 9 samples were American emu oil and 2 samples were Australian emu oil. The oil was purchased from emu oil retailers and on ebay. The results were very surprising and shocking. Only 5 of the 11 samples of emu oil showed that they were pure emu oil.

This study validated the need for a fatty acid profile to be included in the Emu Oil Trade Rules for Grade A Fully Refined Emu Oil which is the standard that AEA Certified Fully Refined® Emu Oil must meet. A copy of the study was passed out to all members attending the meeting. Members thanked the Board for all the work that had been put into revising the Trade Rules, the AEA Certified Program, and for the emu oil study. Dr. Alam from Texas A&M University made positive comments on the study and how it will help the industry.

Find out more about how you can be sure you are purchasing genuine pure emu oil.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

2013 Emu Egg Art Contest Announced

2013 Emu Egg Art Contest Announced

As a way of promoting emu egg shell art, the American Emu Association (AEA) will be hosting the “2013 EGGS’travaganza Egg Art Contest”. Winners will be chosen and all entries will be displayed in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, on Friday, July 12th, during the 2013 National AEA Convention .

Egg artists are reminded that all types of emu egg artwork are welcome to enter. These large, dark green eggs with layers of blue, gray, turquoise and white, lend themselves to the creation of beautiful art work. The eggs are first emptied, washed and sanitized. When dried, the egg shells can be painted, hung like Christmas ornaments, made into jewelry boxes, music boxes or luxuriously decorated like the famous Faberge eggs.

The strength and thickness of an emu egg shell makes it a durable canvas for all types of painting from egg critters to beautiful landscapes. Both acrylic and oil paints can be used successfully to create amazing art.
Many artists carve emu eggs because of the different color layers. The dark green outer covering varies from hunter green to almost black, the middle color is a teal green to blue and the inside is a bright white. The teal and blue are actually as many as seven subtle layers of color, each about the thickness of a sheet of paper. These different layers of color can be utilized to add texture and depth to artwork. The texture, contrast and natural colors of the shell make even a simple design dramatic. Many interesting items, including nightlights, can be made from a lacework cut eggshell.
Artists are reminded that every piece of artwork must incorporate the use of an emu egg shell.

Egg artists from across the United States and around the world will be donating their emu egg artwork to help promote the emu industry. In exchange for their donation, their artwork will be showcased through national display, both online and at the convention. The 2013 contest entries will be showcased on the contest website through at least June 1st of the following year, giving excellent exposure and promotion for the artists. Artists will compete for cash prizes that will be awarded for the top 3 entries with the highest bids. A Silent Auction with live bidders and online bidding will be used to determine the winners.

All submitted emu egg art will be on display for public viewing online at the contest website and in person on July 12, 2013 at the Quality Inn &Suites Conference Center, 880 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

For more information about the “2013 EGGS’travaganza Egg Art Contest”, visit www.AEAEggArtContest.com or call 970-493-9262.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

2012 Emu Egg Art Contest Winners Announced

2012 Emu Egg Art Contest Winners Announced

Three Egg Art Guild Members Take Top Honors

During the American Emu Association (AEA) Convention held in July in Kansas City, Missouri, the emu egg art contest winners were chosen. Each entry, with a unique artistic style, shows the versatility of the emu egg shell. Painted, carved, etched or decorated, these works of art are beautiful to behold.

Three of the four winning decorated egg shells were created by members of the International Egg Art Guild (IEAG).

First Place went to an egg titled “The Climber” created by Nicholas A. Poleschuk, Jr, IEAG, www.PoleschukStudios.com. His egg, carved and sculpted using a high speed engraver followed by a special file to create the extremely smooth surface and sharp lines, depicts a Madagascar Mantella Laevigata Frog climbing up a leaf.

Second Place went to an egg titled “Summer’s Floral Bouquet” created by Laura Schiller, Westminster, Colorado, IEAG, www.lauraseggs.com. This exquisite egg shell was hand carved and decorated using a low speed drill, flowers and ropes made from Polymer Clay and silver curling wire.

Third Place went to two eggs that tied for this honor.

“Tulips in Michigan” was created by Satoko Kano, IEAG, http://satokokano.web.fc2.com. Vinegar etching using beeswax and immersion in plain white vinegar, repeating the procedure 6-7 times, produced a striking egg shell.

“Land of the Free” was hand painted by Mike Jorgensen, Medford, Wisconsin, [email protected] His painting of Mt Rushmore and the American flag seemed to bring the scene to life.

To see the other amazing entries in the 2012 “EGGS’travaganza” AEA Egg Art Contest, visit the website, http://www.AEAEggArtContest.com. These entries will remain online until next year’s contestants are posted, giving a full year of promotion to these artists.

The 2013 contest will take place in July and the application form will be available on the website for download early in the new year. Now is the time to start planning your entry.

The American Emu Association sponsors this contest to promote egg art in the emu industry. The public is welcome to enter their artwork and to bid on the entries either online or in person during the annual AEA Convention.

First Place: “The Climber” created by Nicholas A. Poleschuk, Jr, IEAG

Second Place: “Summer’s Floral Bouquet” created by Laura Schiller, Westminster, Colorado, IEAG

Third Place: “Tulips in Michigan” was created by Satoko Kano, IEAG

Third Place: “Land of the Free” was hand painted by Mike Jorgensen, Medford, Wisconsin

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.