Emu Oil Refining Statement

The American Emu Association (AEA) does not endorse or recommend any particular method of emu oil refining.

The AEA does insist that whatever method of refining is used, the emu oil must match the fatty acid profile parameters for pure emu oil and that it meets or exceeds the standards for Fully Refined Emu Oil – Grade A as listed in the Emu Oil Trade Rules guidelines.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

AEA Certified Emu Oil Program

AEA Certified Emu Oil Program

The AEA Certified Emu Oil Program was developed to establish quality control measures to ensure that pure emu oil legitimately displaying the AEA Certified Fully Refined® seal or being marketed using the corresponding verbiage is a high quality product that meets or exceeds the industry recognized standards for Fully Refined Grade A Emu Oil as defined in the Emu Oil Trade Rules (rule 103).

Both the verbiage “AEA Certified Fully Refined®” and the corresponding seal are registered trademarks of the AEA and can only be used by AEA members with board approval. Unauthorized use of either will be considered trademark infringement and will be dealt with accordingly.

If you are looking to purchase AEA Certified Emu Oil please consider doing business with one of our AEA Certified™ Business Members.

The AEA has created a Consumer Alert page listing those who are in violation of the American Emu Associations policies for use of their trademarked properties.

Use the links below to learn more about the program or to apply. All emu oil product companies, wholesalers and retailers who are members in good standing of the AEA are invited to apply.

Below are links to the FDA web site where you can learn about the government regulations for bottling, labeling, and promoting cosmetic goods.

For questions about AEA Certified Emu Oil™ Program contact us by email.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

2012 Emu Egg Art Contest Winners Announced

2012 Emu Egg Art Contest Winners Announced

Three Egg Art Guild Members Take Top Honors

During the American Emu Association (AEA) Convention held in July in Kansas City, Missouri, the emu egg art contest winners were chosen. Each entry, with a unique artistic style, shows the versatility of the emu egg shell. Painted, carved, etched or decorated, these works of art are beautiful to behold.

Three of the four winning decorated egg shells were created by members of the International Egg Art Guild (IEAG).

First Place went to an egg titled “The Climber” created by Nicholas A. Poleschuk, Jr, IEAG, www.PoleschukStudios.com. His egg, carved and sculpted using a high speed engraver followed by a special file to create the extremely smooth surface and sharp lines, depicts a Madagascar Mantella Laevigata Frog climbing up a leaf.

Second Place went to an egg titled “Summer’s Floral Bouquet” created by Laura Schiller, Westminster, Colorado, IEAG, www.lauraseggs.com. This exquisite egg shell was hand carved and decorated using a low speed drill, flowers and ropes made from Polymer Clay and silver curling wire.

Third Place went to two eggs that tied for this honor.

“Tulips in Michigan” was created by Satoko Kano, IEAG, http://satokokano.web.fc2.com. Vinegar etching using beeswax and immersion in plain white vinegar, repeating the procedure 6-7 times, produced a striking egg shell.

“Land of the Free” was hand painted by Mike Jorgensen, Medford, Wisconsin, [email protected] His painting of Mt Rushmore and the American flag seemed to bring the scene to life.

To see the other amazing entries in the 2012 “EGGS’travaganza” AEA Egg Art Contest, visit the website, http://www.AEAEggArtContest.com. These entries will remain online until next year’s contestants are posted, giving a full year of promotion to these artists.

The 2013 contest will take place in July and the application form will be available on the website for download early in the new year. Now is the time to start planning your entry.

The American Emu Association sponsors this contest to promote egg art in the emu industry. The public is welcome to enter their artwork and to bid on the entries either online or in person during the annual AEA Convention.

First Place: “The Climber” created by Nicholas A. Poleschuk, Jr, IEAG

Second Place: “Summer’s Floral Bouquet” created by Laura Schiller, Westminster, Colorado, IEAG

Third Place: “Tulips in Michigan” was created by Satoko Kano, IEAG

Third Place: “Land of the Free” was hand painted by Mike Jorgensen, Medford, Wisconsin

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Not All Eggs Are Decorated Just For Easter!

Emu Egg Shells Take Center Stage

Many families color eggs for the Easter holiday. In some homes it is an early Spring ritual. The decorated eggs are so bright and colorful! But, instead of chicken eggs, some “eggers” (people who decorate egg shells) use emu egg shells to create beautiful works of art year round.

These large, dark green eggs can weigh 1 to 2 pounds each when first laid. The emu egg shells, with layers of white, blue, gray, turquoise and green, are a perfect start for creating a masterpiece. The fresh eggs are first emptied, washed and sanitized. When dried, the egg shells can be painted, carved, hung like Christmas ornaments, made into jewelry boxes/music boxes or decorated like the famous Faberge eggs.

The strength and thickness of an emu egg shell make it a durable canvas for all types of painting from egg critters to beautiful landscapes. Both acrylic and oil paints can be used successfully to create amazing art.

Many artists carve emu eggs because of the many different color layers. The dark green outer covering varies from hunter green to almost black, the middle color is a turquoise/teal green to blue and the inside is a bright white. The teal and blue are actually as many as seven subtle layers of color, each about the thickness of a sheet of paper.

These different layers of color can be utilized by carvers to add texture and depth to artwork and make even a simple design dramatic. The texture, contrast and natural colors of the shell make even a simple design dramatic without the use of any paint or other coloring. Many interesting works of art, including nightlights, can be made from a lacework cut egg shell.

Pieces of emu egg shell can be used to make inserts for jewelry and the smaller broken pieces can be used to make mosaic artwork.

A variety of emu egg shell artwork can be seen on the American Emu Association website, www.AEAEggArtContest.com, where artists competed in last year’s “Eggs’travaganza” contest. Works of art from all over the United States along with information about the artists, can be viewed on this website.

This year the American Emu Association (AEA) will once again be hosting the 2012 “EGGS’travaganza” Emu Egg Art Contest. The contest/silent auction will be held online, starting the end of June and all entries will be displayed on the final day, Friday, July 13th during the 2012 National AEA Convention at the Marriott Kansas City Airport Hotel, Kansas City, Missouri.

Donating a decorated egg will give the contestant a chance to win cash and will provide almost a full year of online exposure for them, their business and their decorated egg. For more information about the 2012 “EGGS’travaganza”, visit www.AEAEggArtContest.com or call 970-493-9262.

The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing the emu industry that consists of emu growers, product companies and related businesses. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

AEA Certified Emu Oil Program Updated

(January 2012) There have been cases where Emu Oil has been adulterated or cut with other ingredients and then an attempt was made to pass the resulting product off as pure Emu Oil. Mike Eppley, president of the American Emu Association (AEA) recently reported, “We have heard of cases where unscrupulous dealers have cut the emu oil with vegetable oil or some other oil and then tried to sell it to an unsuspecting product company.”

This concern was one reason that the American Emu Association sought guidance from the American Oil Chemist Society (AOCS) to establish the Emu Oil Trade Rules. According to the Emu Oil Trade Rules, there are only three grades of emu oil recognized in the United States: Crude (Grade C), Once Refined (Grade B) and Fully Refined (Grade A).

In recent years, the AEA has taken this a step further by issuing an AEA Certified Fully Refined seal that can be used only on AEA approved, Grade “A”, Fully Refined Emu Oil. To be approved, this Fully Refined Emu Oil must come from registered batches and must have been refined in an AEA Certified emu oil refinery and bottled by an AEA Certified bottler. In order to register a batch with AEA, an AEA approved refinery must provide proof that an AOCS chemist tested the batch and that it met or exceeded the criteria established by the Emu Oil Trade Rules for Fully Refined Emu Oil at the time of testing.

A sample from each AOCS tested Fully Refined (Grade “A”) batch is held in storage and can be pulled for testing if there is any question of product purity. All approved batch numbers are kept on file at the AEA office. The AEA Certified Fully Refined seal can be used only on Pure (Grade “A”) Fully Refined Emu Oil, not on formulated products, even though they may contain this oil.

In order to use the Registered Trademark seal, “AEA Certified Fully Refined”, on labels, websites or in advertising the product company or distributor must receive approval from the AEA. To be approved, you must start with Certified Emu Oil from a registered batch. It must be bottled by an AEA approved bottler.

AEA applications for approved uses of the AEA Certified Fully Refined seal must be submitted to the AEA for approval. These applications and full details about the program are available on the AEA website at https://aea-emu.org/resources/aea-certified-emu-oil-program or by contacting the AEA by phone or e-mail.

For businesses purchasing oil in bulk from reputable product companies, seeing the seal and batch number along with reviewing the Certificate of Analysis, assures them that they are purchasing a pure, safe product to use in their health and beauty formulations. These companies can then pass this assurance on to their customers by applying for and receiving approval for the use of the AEA Certified Fully Refined seal. All refineries, bottlers and product companies must be registered and approved by the AEA in order to use the AEA Certified Fully Refined Logo.

Now in it’s 12th year, the AEA Certified Emu Oil program is considered a success, with additional product companies registering for use of the seal each month. The AEA is the sole source for granting permission to use the AEA Certified Fully Refined seal.

The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing the emu industry. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that produce beneficial products for society.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Farm to Finish Includes Fat, Leather and Feathers – Emu Farmers Do it All

San Angelo, TX – Unlike other forms of livestock production where the animal is sold directly to a processor, the emu industry is currently farm-to-finish. The emu farmer must arrange for the processing of the 14 to 16 month old bird as well as handle sale of the meat and food by-products. One food by-product, the fat, produces an omega-rich oil that is receiving rave reviews for its transdermal, anti-inflammatory and cholesterol lowering capabilities. “I guess it sounds odd to hear that fat can lower cholesterol”, states American Emu Association president Charles Ramey, “but animal trials at the University of Massachusetts indicate that emu oil does lower cholesterol when taken internally.” According to Ramey, the association hopes to have information on human trial studies to present at their 2006 convention in Madison, Wisconsin. In the meantime, the oil is used in a variety of health and beauty products produced by numerous companies as an inactive ingredient.

In addition to the meat and fat, the emu provides two forms of leather. The body hide provides thin, supple leather used in clothing as well as accessories such as belts, wallets and other items. The leg skins or “leggings” produce an almost reptilian leather that is heavy enough for hardwearing items such as boots.

Less pricey than those of its ostrich cousin, emu feathers have found niches in fashion, fishing and craft industries. Not only is the versatile emu body feather showing up as a trim for hats, but also as an accent for clothing, in hair ornaments, jewelry, and even fishing lures. Some bulk suppliers have waiting lists for the popular straw-like tail feathers that are used in everything from cat toys to floral arrangements.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, emu are being raised on over 5,000 farms across the country. Many of these farms sell their finished, consumer ready products online or at local farmers markets.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

A Wholesome Combination

A Wholesome Combination Oatmeal and emu combine to make healthier, but still flavorful dishes.

San Angelo, TX – Making healthy food choices is important, especially for people under the care of a physician. When family members equate healthy diets with eating cardboard, modifying their eating habits can be an uphill struggle. This can be very frustrating for the cook trying to provide nourishing meals. According to Chef James Ehler of Minnesota, some simple substitutions can update an old family favorite, making it a healthier, but still flavorful dish.

Two adjustments that can be made to meat loaf recipes are fairly simple. Instead of bread crumbs, use oatmeal as a binder. Oatmeal is a complex carbohydrate with high fiber. It will encourage slow digestion and help to stabilize blood-glucose levels. Replace beef with a leaner meat, such as emu. You can use ground emu the same way you use very lean ground beef, says Ehler. Recognized as Heart Healthy by the American Heart Association, emu is low in saturated fats and ranked best in 15 out of 20 essential nutrients in a USDA funded study at the University of Wisconsin. This makes it an excellent health choice for those with immune deficiencies.

Although oatmeal is easily found, alternative meats such as emu currently require a little more effort to locate. According to Charles Ramey, president of the American Emu Association (AEA), the association receives calls periodically from consumers looking for the lean red meat. We either provide them with a list of companies that can handle their request, or provide their contact information to the companies, said Ramey.

Emu meat is available either vacuum packed frozen or fresh. It may be mail-ordered from individual producers or can be found at retail in specialty food stores, health food stores and retail establishments around the country. According to AEA, emu is a deep red colored meat with no marbling. Because it is very lean, there will be little to no shrinkage during cooking. A moist heat and shorter cooking time is recommended for most recipes. Chef Ehler offers several main dish recipes using emu, as well as other alternative meats, on his website www.foodreference.com, including the one below.

Heart-y Emu Meat Loaf

2 lbs Ground Emu 3/4 cup Quick Cooking Rolled Oats 3/4 cup Fresh Tomatoes, chopped fine 1/2 cup Yellow Onion, chopped fine 1/2 cup Green Pepper, chopped fine 2 cloves Garlic, minced 2 Whole Eggs, slightly beaten 1/4 cup Catsup 1 1/2 TB Worcestershire Sauce 2 TB Pickapeppa Sauce OR Spicy BBQ Sauce 2 tsp Oregano 1 1/2 tsp Black Pepper 1 1/2 tsp Salt

TOPPING

1/2 Cup Ketchup 2 Tablespoons Honey 3 Tablespoons Spicy BBQ Sauce

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  • Mix all ingredients gently, but well and form into a loaf in a baking pan.
  • Do not over mix, as this tends to make for a tough (too firm) meat loaf.
  • Shape into a loaf, and using a butter-knife, score a crisscross pattern on top of loaf.
  • Mix topping ingredients together and coat top of meat loaf.
  • Bake covered for 45 minutes, uncover and bake another 45 minutes.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Heart Healthy Never Tasted So Good!

It may seem odd to hear of a red meat being touted as a health food; but the emu industry is doing exactly that, and with good cause. “Many consumers have been instructed to give up red meat because of cholesterol, but since emu is low in saturated fats, as well as being packed with the vitamins and minerals needed by those with immune deficiencies, it is an excellent health choice,” said Charles Ramey, AEA president. Recognized as Heart Healthy by the American Heart Association, emu ranked best in 15 out of 20 essential nutrients in a USDA funded study at the University of Wisconsin.

The results of this research have brought emu to the forefront of alternative meat choices, but the market remains minute compared to standbys like beef or turkey. Last year Americans consumed an estimated 300,000 pounds of emu, this year consumption is estimated at over half a million pounds. “The cattle industry deals in tons, we deal in pounds,” laughed Ramey. Ramey went on to say that the American Emu Association receives calls periodically from consumers looking for the lean red meat. “We either provide them with a list of companies that can handle their request, or provide their contact information to the companies,” said Ramey.

Emu meat is available either vacuum packed or fresh. It may be mail-ordered from individual producers or can be found at retail in specialty food stores, health food stores and retail establishments around the country. According to AEA, emu is deep red colored meat with no marbling. Because it is very lean, there will be little to no shrinkage during cooking. A moist heat and shorter cooking time is recommended.

Heart Healthy Meat Loaf

2 pounds ground emu
1/2 cup oatmeal
1 chicken egg
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1/2 cup minced onion
1/2 cup minced bell pepper

Mix all ingredients by hand in large bowl. You should have a very moist mixture. Pour into casserole and bake covered at 350° for 45 minutes. Remove lid and bake an additional 10 minutes. Serves 6.

Emu Scaloppini with Mushroom Sauce

1 pound emu steaks (1/4 inch thick)
2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
1 1/2 cup chicken broth
1/2 teaspoon lemon pepper
1/2 stick of margarine
1 medium onion, sliced
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon parsley, minced

Lightly pound the steaks until 1/8″ thick. Sprinkle with lemon pepper. In a 12″ skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of margarine over moderate heat. (Add more margarine as needed) Sear emu steaks on both sides and transfer to a platter, cover with foil and keep warm. Add remaining ingredients (except for parsley) to skillet. Bring to a boil and boil uncovered; stirring frequently, until slightly thickened and vegetables are tender. Pour over emu steaks. Serves 4.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

Nutrient Rich Soup Chases Winter Chill

Frost on the windshield, leaves crunching underfoot, that nip in the air that sends you inside with flushed cheeks, it all adds up to soup weather. Soup comes in single servings or family size containers. You can get it with pop-top lids, in disposable heat and eat bowls or even foil packets. It comes condensed or ready to heat and serve. Despite the instant comfort offered by the supermarket soup aisle, there is just nothing like homemade soup on a cold winter’s day.

Homemade soup is almost impossible to mess up. Ingredients can be added or deleted from the recipe; it can be made using items at hand and can be sipped from a mug or eaten from a bowl. You can start with a simple stock and turn it into something light and nourishing or wonderful and filling. Vegetable soup can be dressed up with meat or poultry. To avoid the fats found in some meat, many cooks are turning to emu. In addition to being lower in saturated fats, emu is higher in protein and eleven different vitamins and minerals including iron, zinc, B12, B6, selenium and potassium than most other meats. This nutrient-rich red meat may be mail-ordered from individual producers or can be found at retail in specialty food stores, health food stores and retail establishments around the country. For additional information about emu meat and where it can be found, contact the American Emu Association at 541-332-0675 or check out their web site at www.aea-emu.org.

This rich soup is something to look forward to when you have been working outside on a cold winter’s day.

Winter Rich Soup

1 pound ground emu
3 large all-purpose potatoes (peeled and cubed)
2 cans (13 3/4 ounces) chicken broth
1 large or 2 medium-sized onions (roughly 1 cup) chopped
2 medium sweet green pepper, halved, seeded and chopped
2 medium-size sweet red pepper, halved, seeded and chopped
3 to 6 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
1 cup sour cream
1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese

In large saucepan or Dutch oven, boil the potatoes in enough water to cover until tender. Drain and mash, adding chicken broth and blending until smooth. Set soup mixture aside.

Saute onion, green bell pepper, and red bell pepper in butter until softened, about 10 minutes. Add ground emu and brown lightly, seasoning with pepper. Add to soup mixture and heat until just boiling. Reduce heat. Add sour cream, stirring gently. Serve in soup bowls, garnish with the cheddar cheese. Serves 8.

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.

2012 National Emu Convention Draws Near

Missouri Event Provides Learning Experience

KANSAS CITY, Missouri – On July 13th-15th emu farmers from across the United States and around the world will attend the 3 day 2012 American Emu Association (AEA) National Convention being held this year at the Marriott Kansas City Airport Hotel, Kansas City, Missouri. AEA members along with other emu growers, will meet for 3 days of education and demonstrations with a chance to meet new people and visit with old friends.

AEA Board members, Certified Business Members (CBM) and State Presidents will be meeting prior to the start of the convention.

Convention attendees will be brought up to date on industry concerns, current emu oil research and will have the opportunity to participate in round table discussions. Ample time will be included to network with other emu farmers, product companies and processors from across the nation and around the world. The booth area, labeled the “EMU MALL”, will be open to the public. The “EMU MALL” will offer the opportunity to browse booths that showcase emu related products such as leather, health/beauty products and emu egg art, while still others will offer farming merchandise or information.

The AEA “Eggs’travaganza” Egg Art Contest will conclude on the evening of July 13th at the convention. A variety of emu egg shell artwork entries will be listed on the American Emu Association website, www.AEAEggArtContest.com for a Silent Auction shortly after June 15th. Works of art from all over the United States along with information about the artists, can be viewed on this website with the opportunity to bid.

The focus of this year’s convention is “Continuing the Journey”. Topics will include Feed, Industry Status, Profitability, Business Opportunities, Marketing and the Basics of Raising & Handling Emus. With the increasing high demand for emu fat, oil and meat, this is an event you will not want to miss!

The annual AEA business meeting on Friday afternoon, a Friday evening Welcome Night and a Saturday night Banquet will help to round out this 2 1/2 day event.

“There will be an incredible amount of hints, tips and practical advice provided”, stated Joylene Reavis, 2012 convention co-chair. “We plan to share a lot of information about the emu industry with plenty of time to spend visiting with old friends and meeting new ones.”

Founded in 1989, The American Emu Association is a non-profit trade association representing breeders, producers and marketers of emu meat, oil and other emu co-products. The emu industry is an alternative agricultural industry, dominated by the small farmer, who is devoted to humane and environmentally positive practices that will produce beneficial products for society. For more information about the American Emu Association (AEA) or the emu industry visit http://www.aea-emu.org or call 541-332-0675.